Saturday, September 25, 2010

wilson and sausage



sausage and chard saute with polenta

As promised, this is the second in a series of recipes using Italian sausage. It's very simple and the flavors are exquisite together. This one came together in 20 minutes flat, I kid you not. I loved last weeks variation, but I liked this one even better. My Native American DNA tingled over the creamy polenta.

Cook 1 1/2 pounds Italian sausage (I used turkey sausages) in olive oil in a skillet over medium heat, 10 to 12 minutes, remove and slice. Add 4 cloves sliced garlic to the skillet, sizzle over medium heat for a few seconds, add 1 bunch Swiss chard (leaves cut into strips), salt and fresh ground pepper to taste, cook until wilted, 3 to 4 minutes. Fold in sausage. Serve over polenta. (I used the quick-cook variety). This dish is both earthy and elegant.


You know how much I love faces, especially in nature. This cute little guy, most appropriately named Wilson, said hello to me this week. (I really didn't add his smiley face.) Don't you love his dapper Scottish tam? He's here on my desk today, keeping me company.

55 comments:

  1. My love for polenta knows no limits. I even incorporate it into mexican food by just adding green chilis - haven't paired it with chard but sure will now. Yum. Would it be weird to eat it for breakfast?

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  2. It would be delicious for breakfast. But, then, I think I could eat just about anything for breakfast! :)

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  3. It would be perfect served for brunch.

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  4. The deer have eaten all my Swiss Chard, but I may try this with Perpetual Spinach.

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  5. I love polenta..
    don't make it nearly enough.

    and your little acorn is charming. love the tam reference. when my girls were younger we had years of Highland Dancing, always a soft spot for kilts and the like.

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  6. I am a vegetarian... so... well...

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  7. Hey, Cro, I almost didn't recognize you. Love the new avatar!

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  8. I love to cook for my family, and I often try recipes from different world cousins. One of the advantages is that my kids learned to eat a variety of foods. It is also great conversational theme to talk about all the different cultures at dinner time. But sometimes when I don't have much time for elaborate diners I make simpler but great dishes similar to yours. Bon appetit.

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  9. Yum, this one is going into my recipe box. Wilson .... love the name. That's hilarious!

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  10. I love these easy recipes. I think about eating them. I think, that's so easy, Marc could do that. but of course he doesn't. I may have to start cooking again at least once in a while.

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  11. The sausage dish...so simple and delicious looking. And Wilson is very cute.

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  12. my mouth is watering and it's not time for lunch yet. shame on you, willow!

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  13. I tried your last week's sausage recipe yesterday, with the addition of some apple slices, and ate it for two delicious meals.

    I sliced the sausage first though. Then cooked it.

    Isnt all polenta quick? I use corn meal and water (though you can throw in some grated cheese or onion etc) and it is done likity split.
    (how do you spell likity???)

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  14. Suki, apples sounds like a wonderful addition to the white bean version! I'll toss in a few next time I make it. My polenta says "quick cook" on the container, but you're right. I suppose all polenta cooks up lickity split. How do you spell it, anyway?

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  15. The recipe sounds delish . . . are you having properly autumnal weather yet?

    Wilson really does look like a smiley Scot!

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  16. Perfect for fall! A friend of mine serves sauteed kale with caramelized pears -- they might work in here too! So many things to try...

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  17. I just bought a bunch of Swiss chard the other day. Since I've got to make another grocery store run today to pick up some food for a grandchild who is spending the weekend with me, I am going to get some sausage to cook with the chard. I think I will be a good southern girl and make cheese grits instead of the polenta....sounds delicious.

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  18. Yum! An Autumn dish if ever I saw one.
    And hello Wilson.

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  19. Even as you cook and putter
    in the Manor kitchen, you never
    lose the poet's sensitivity; gorging
    your taste buds, and olfactory
    regions with this fetching
    concoction. As a kid we were
    served corn meal mush, and I
    never liked it much; preferred
    raisin bran. Again I further my
    culinary knowledge and basic
    education just by reading your
    recipes here. I love how since
    you are using Italian sausage,
    then it must be served over
    polenta; which even as just a
    word is borrowed from the
    Italian--but then because it
    is essentially maize, this tingles
    your Native American DNA.
    I read where polenta is
    considered to be "a peasant food.",
    which makes it attractive to my
    proletarian palette. Today it seems
    to be enjoying a resurgence of
    popularity, garnished with lovely
    sauces, cheeses, and meats,
    ironic since it is reputed to be
    "essentially a bland and a simple
    food." But of course one could
    malign the glorious potato is
    much the same manner, and look
    at all the wonders cooking with
    it provides. Wilson is cute beyond
    imagination, and certainly draws
    our memory to the critter in
    CASTAWAY with Tom Hanks;
    sadly lost at sea. My wife, clinging
    to her Texas roots tells me that
    she has heard of polenta, but
    does not recall eating it. I have
    never had any either, unless one
    counts the divers dishes of
    corn meal mush shoved down
    my pie hole.

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  20. Oh yum! I adore Italian food, and the picture you've shared with us is simply marvellous. I'll certainly be trying this out.

    And Wilson is wonderful, his wee face immediately makes one smile :D

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  21. This sounds warming and delicious!
    I like your acorn chum ;-)

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  22. That photo makes my mouth water. How delightful--was it as good as the picture looks?! lol

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  23. Hi, Willow! I'd like to feature your poem "Infinity" on next Week's FAT Tuesday Artist Spotlight. May I?

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  24. Well, Willow! Any recipe description that includes the word "tingle" is worthy of trying! :-)

    I also love your little Scottish acorn. How cool is that?!

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  25. Yep, Stevie, cheese grits would be excellent here, too. Let me know how you like it, southern style!

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  26. Beth, yes, of course, thank you! It would be an honor.

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  27. Polenta, my friend made it with italian sauce on it and basil. Loved it. I will try this looks yummy

    yvonne

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  28. You nourish my soul with that gorgeous images, Willow! Now, if only I could eat it too!

    Jeanette (from Everton Terrace), I'll join you eating polenta for breakfast any day! Polenta is one of the healthiest grains around, for a number of reasons. ;-)

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  29. oh willow...you got my attention with this one...looks so wonderful....yum

    and the little acorn is charming...my kitchen windowsill is full of them..all different kinds..collected from sea to shining sea :-)

    happy to visit with you today....

    happy weekend, my friend
    kary
    xxx

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  30. I tend to do less meat than most, but this attracts me unto saliva. The polenta and chard, of course, by the poundful.

    TFool

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  31. Wilson is a pretty handsome desk companion. I think the polenta sounds wonderful with the sausage.

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  32. I love polenta...and I just bought some turkey Italian sausage and broccoli raab which will be cooked up tomorrow in just this manner! It is a taste of autumn...

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  33. I hope you are not intending to incorporate Wilson into the recipe.

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  34. Hehee...NO not my sweet little friend Wilson!!

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  35. willow i hope you're sitting down but even though i know a lot about polenta, i'm almost certain i've never eaten it!! oh man what a goof!! maybe i can find someone to make it for me and then i can learn how to make my own!!! steven

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  36. Oh that looks heavenly...
    and I could totally dive into that polenta!

    Love that natty little Wilson...he's adorable

    though they are creations of the photographer
    "How Are You Peeling" by Saxton Freymann & Joost Elffers will tickle you with it's very expressive collection of fruits and veggies :)

    Rene

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  37. Rene, oh, yes, I've seen those "Peeling" photos. They're fabulous!!

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  38. We love polenta and had some earlier this week; Tonight, we're having venison sausages!

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  39. makes my bowl morning bowl of oatmeal look pathetic.

    yum.

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  40. Derrick, I've never tried venison, but I hear it's rather tasty.

    Cro, "perpetual spinach" has been wandering around in my head all day. I've got to use it in a poem.

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  41. This is another recipe that we will be glad to try.

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  42. Oh my, this makes my fish and chips on a Saturday night seem rather dull.

    CJ xx

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  43. This non-cook just may have to
    hit the kitchen and shake up
    a bit of this lusciousness .... .
    well done Miss Willow!


    judith

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  44. Willow -- amazing to find such an acorn with a smile on its face. It certainly is dapper as you suggested. -- barbara

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  45. That looks so delicious! Italian sausage and polenta is on my shopping list already.

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  46. Blogger is so not cooperating--for the 4th try--I wonder if Nature created that wilson or if some little cutie did and left it for you to discover.

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  47. I love your little Wilson! :)

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  48. I might actually attempt this one myself! (But I'll use pork sausage, if you don't mind!) It looks great, and as for the garlic... sounds like an excellent touch!

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  49. Willow that recipe looks wonderful. I will definitely try that one too! Thanks for sharing. I love your little friend Wilson. Charming!

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  50. love it. wilson, that is classic. makes me contemplate growing chard in my garden next year as well!

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  51. I never sausage a good meal.

    (Sorry, but I couldn't resist a good pun.)

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  52. Sounds wonderful....and Willow i am the same way...i could eat just about anything for breakfast. Hope you have a wonderful Monday! :-)

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)