Monday, October 19, 2009

Sylvia's Reprise

This week's instructions from TFE were to watch the movie Garage
and use it has a prompt to write a poem. Well, the only DVD version
I could find of this particular film was the non-American PAL format.
Darn. So, EEjit was kind enough to give us an alternative prompt of
listening to Sylvia Plath read her powerful poem, Lady Lazarus.
(You guessed right. He didn't have to ask me more than once.)

So, I'm hopping aboard [The Poetry Bus] with the following poem.


.

Sylvia's Reprise



Lady Lazarus
rises
from the ashes
of an empty
cigarette pack,

exhumes
her Venus
shell,
from a turning
burning
death camp
hell.

Heaven's
verdant stole
she vamps
from me,

while Zephyrs
puff and drag
her craven soul
to sea.

.

willow, 2009

.

artwork: Botticelli's Birth of Venus

53 comments:

  1. Wow, I do believe I'm first! What a happenstance.

    Vivid imagery, Willow. This is wonderful.

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  2. Hmm. Very nice take on that one. TFE; thanks for the link.

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  3. "from the ashes
    of an empty
    cigarette pack, exhumes
    her Venus
    shell,
    from a turning
    burning
    death camp
    hell..."

    Wow, Willow! I love this! Great ticket for the bus!

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  4. wonderful Willow - very powerful :)

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  5. I'm not much for poetry (which is why I usually don't comment on your poetry days) but this one I like very much.

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  6. Some wonderful words and memorable images here. A great complement to the Plath poem.

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  7. I never got past the naked lady! LOL!

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  8. INTENSE!!!!! It delivers, Willow!

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  9. that was amazing imagery willow...

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  10. Lovely Willow.

    And Botticelli's Birth of Venus was one of the many works of art I got to see in person while in Italy. Simply marvelous......

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  11. HDD, I am sooo envious! I would love to see Birth of Venus in person. I will someday!

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  12. I think I read a book The Birth Of Venus. It was absolutely marvelous. I liked the poem. I will see if I can find the book. I believe it is about Michelangelo and it is unbelievable. I sometimes right but usually when I am depressed. Can't see to write poetry when happy. I write prose when happy and poetry when sad.
    QMM

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  13. I'm crazy about the last stanza..."While Zephyrs puff and drag her craven soul to see"!!! Nailed this one Willow.

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  14. Beautiful phrasing Willow. I love the imagery you conjure with your words.

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  15. Does anyone else think Sylvia Plath looks a lot like Botticelli's Venus?

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  16. I love the imagery on this one...what a beautiful painting, too! It would be amazing to see in person!

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  17. Goodness, I am speechless. Your poem is amazing.

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  18. Yes, I liked this too. Another good reason for becoming a 'regular'.

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  19. Margaret Atwood?
    I would have guess it was hers, this poem,
    if I hadn't known better.
    Brava! :-)

    Have you read her collection "Morning in the Burned House"?

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  20. I love it too Willow. So rich as always! I have seen The Birth of Venus and it is stunning! Much better in the 'flesh' than the prints. xx

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  21. Very nice, Willow. I like the word combinations.

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  22. "Morning in the Burned House" is now on my list. Thanks, Merisi. You always steer me in the best poetry directions!

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  23. This takes me back to two courses ago on my studies when we had a chapter on Plath. Amazing poetry, strange strange woman

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  24. LOL at Otin's comment, but your poem is indeed a very strong one Willow. Congrats.

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  25. Never have heard Plath's voice before and enjoyed hearing her difficult poem read aloud (difficult images to hear). Your poem quite fine as an echo of her burning and death images. Love the first phrases. Humor. It has just occured to me to wonder if Plath had humor in her poems. Of course, have in the past read much of her work, but never perused it with that quality in mind.

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  26. Very nice departure from the expected!

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  27. Fantastic. Wow. How do you do it? I salute you.

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  28. Beautifully done--I like this well, which is interesting because I have to say I don't care too much for the original Plath poem.

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  29. Without a doubt, I much prefer yours.

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  30. I love, love, love that "ashes from teh cigarette pack"! She really drags the best out of one, in spite of herself, doesn't she?

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  31. Willow, this is lovely! The last line is powerful, "Zephyrs' puffing and dragging her out to sea." Wonderful imagery!

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  32. Interesting Sylvia Plath inspired poem..

    But, when I got back into blogland I could't wait to go back in time to the Manor Ball and have a look, since I was sadly missing in action at the time. I love love the second annual ball post and comments, plus of course the day after.. so sorry I missed it, but was with you in spirit, driving round the african continent!

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  33. Karen, the notion of someone in far away Africa thinking about the Manor Ball is curiously delightful. We missed you!

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  34. golly, this bus is worth hopping onto. TFE has been trying to get me to buy a ticket, but I'm a bit bashful still. Prose is more my style.

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  35. I like this willow - not least because you have illustrated it with Primavera - my favourite painting of all time.

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  36. "her craven soul" - Poor Sylvia's not getting a lot of sympathy from the passengers on this bus! I, too, prefer your poem to hers.

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  37. OOh!And a bit of Whoa! This is good Willow, real good.This is Lauren Bacall telling us all to 'play it again sam' and yes we do know how to whistle and so does this poem.


    'Zephyrs puff and drag
    her craven soul to sea'

    Neat! Tankjgsxz ye !

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  38. Heh-heh, I didn't think if it in a Lauren Bacall way, but I guess it is a "just pucker up and blow" kinda poem! Thanks, Eej.

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  39. Wow! Clever - Bott's Venus has red hair, of course! I really like the way this amplifies what is positive in Plath's poem - a sequel in a major key.

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  40. I love the ending with the zephyrs - nice work!

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  41. Liked it very much willow, and the use of the word "craven" is inspired - gets the cigarette image and the kick all tied up in two syllables.
    Lovely work, last stanza really stood out for me.

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  42. I love that link. A first time hearing that for me.
    As always, never know what to say her to your poetry as it starts sounding old but it is so true--you are one very very good poet indeed.

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  43. A very powerful and original poem, Willow!

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  44. As always.... a lovely poem....
    The Bach

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  45. Oh.. hi. Don't worry about me. I'm just passing through here. You know, visiting old places I once frequented. I do hope you are keeping well, Ms. Willow. You certainly seem to have a full house. Un de ces jours..

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  46. That first line, that first line! It was sublime!

    Lady Lazarus
    rises
    from the ashes
    of an empty
    cigarette pack

    Packed a punch, dear. It really did. And from there onwards, it spiralled upwards. I am still floating. Wow! You've got that oomph factor, Ms Poet(ess)!

    Greetings from London.

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  47. Hello Willow,

    Wonderful poem. I like the play on words like puff and drag too! And it condenses the Plath poem very effectively.

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)