Thursday, September 10, 2009

Rhythm

Since Monday's post, my DNA has been dancing a jig. I've been
pondering the rhythm of tartans, tweeds and all things autumn and
ancestral.


Tartan


I wear an atlas
of unions and creeds
that falls about me
in familiar folds.

Cloak of Irish peat
and Hoosier loam,
Celtic blue crossroads
meet golden corn.

White stone cottages
to American farms,
split rail fences
and rough hewn barns.

Kindred bands
weaved plat maps
and folk legends.
Junctions of wool

draw me
in from the cold.
Long after looms
and hands are gone,

the rhythm of warp and woof
still keeps me warm.



willow, 2009

65 comments:

  1. I have always found your poetry interesting. Would you ever consider publishing a small book? Just asking is all.

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  2. wow.really well done willow. the first line grabbed me "wearing an atlas" says so much. i am way behind the curve on this one. gonna be a late night finding my rhythm i believe.

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  3. CG, I would love to publish a book of my poetry.

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  4. Talk about synchronicity. I blogged about tartan a few days ago! Neat!

    Willow, I had another dream about numbers. This time the number 26

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  5. ancestry inspires....

    greetings, from Beth

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  6. Willow... I love reading your writings. I wish I could write the beautiful words you do, and shape them... form them, to become a beautiful read, and a lyric to the ear. However, you DID inspire me to put my own tartan on my site. The Simpsons were sooo poor, they had to use the Fraser Tartan. LOL. Love reading your stuff, kiddo!

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  7. Skip, you look incredible. You've been working out, haven't you? :D

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  8. The whole tale of the Vestiarium Scoticum is an interesting one. The role of the English in reconstructing Scots identity is little known, but equally depresses and amuses me.

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  9. Love "the rhythm of warp and woof." Nice images, all of them

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  10. When I saw my side bar pic I knew I would love to hear of the tartan plaids in rhythm! Lovely!

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  11. I feel like I am going to school when I come here sometimes! You are very educational for me!

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  12. WoooHooo!!!!

    I am glad you brought Jigsaw back for the profile pic!!!!! That is the best profile pic, bar none!!!

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  13. You're welcome. I aim to please my gentle readers.

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  14. Cheering from Texas!!

    I've got to sidebar my tartan, too! Maybe this weekend!

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  15. OK..I have to ask. Do you say wooof or wuff? ;)

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  16. Heh-heh, funny, I say woof, not "wuf", as opposed to the way I say "ruf" for roof.

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  17. Beautifully said..tribal connections run deep and forever.

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  18. Lovely, Willow! You should do a blurb book with your photos and poems. This is another gem.

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  19. Willow, the rhythm of the looms and hands that made the tartan cloth. Wow! Rhythm in the cloth, itself! Well done luv :)

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  20. Beautiful, as always, Willow. Love the tartan.

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  21. I love the rhythm of your poem, Willow - and the tartan. I'm not mad on the reds (are they the Stewart ones) - but this blue would suit my wardrobe perfectly

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  22. And I am dancing with your poem, too. What a lot of rhythmical power. And to complement this magnificent post and show you once more (as if we needed it!:-D) how much in synch we both are, this is what I was reading and listening to today in the morning before starting work. Believe me, I'm floating.

    http://www.astrovera.com/philosophy/new-age/43-new-age/44-solfeggio-frequencies.html

    Greetings from London.

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  23. Hello Willow,

    The rhythms of our pasts flow through all of us, some stronger than others. You have a wonderful way of articulating yours.

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  24. Great poetry! Hope you are having a wonderful day :)

    xoxo

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  25. It has always interested me, that objects can hold their memories and suggest their past to the new keeper.

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  26. The poem is nice, but I LOVE the idea of DNA dancing a jig! Wonderful thought!

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  27. Interesting poem, full of meaning! It is always a pleasure to read your take on things.

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  28. Pretty words, pretty plaid

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  29. "the rhythm of warp and woof
    still keeps me warm"
    Lovely couplet. Great choice of words.

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  30. You pretty well sum up the feelings of wearing the tartan willow.

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  31. I'm over from authorblog. Congrats on the Post of the Day Award!

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  32. I wish I could say a rhythm. I really do. I only know one or two.

    Those I learned as a baby are now considered racist -- everybody knew them back then.

    I thought times had changed but then I heard a Republican representative of the people of South Carolina last night telling President Obama he lied, and I realized racism is alive and well in America.

    So, does that mean I can recite the racist rhythms I learned when mother taught me to count my toes?

    No, I have more respect for my fellow bloggers than this man from South Carolina had for the President of the United States.

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  33. Yes, I agree you should do a chapbook of poems about 20 or 25.
    In time for Christmas........?

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  34. Abe, I am amazed at the bigotry that still exists in our country. Unfortunately it has become so evident and ugly in the last year.

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  35. Stirring poetry... enjoyed it very much. Congrats on the POTD nom!

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  36. ewix, I've never put one together. Any suggestions as to one over another? There are a lot of various sites online.

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  37. You've just got a rhythm all your own, don't ya?

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  38. My son-in-law's mom would love this. She is a skilled weaver.
    I can feel the loom.
    Thanks for sharing.

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  39. Aye! I canna argue wi that Lassie!

    Its a verra bonnie poem.

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  40. Thank ya, Barry, me darlin'.

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  41. Willow I decided I will create my tartan :D

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  42. Willow, I love this piece! I really hope that the opportunity to publish falls in your lap. You deserve it!

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  43. Interesting take on the tartan pattern--I really enjoyed this!

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  44. Can anyone explain to me what this is about?

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  45. Lovely imagery, as always!

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  46. Quite a terrific and original poem..my, my! Heritage looms...

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  47. You are so richly talented. You captured differing cultures, time periods, and livelihoods in a few lines. And you wove them into your OWN tartan. Simply lovely.

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  48. I admire people who can write peotry well. It's a gift.....and you have it.

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  49. and speaking of jigs...now, that's a hard rhythm to follow.

    Wonderful poem. I've re-read it about three times. It has a great rhythm to it, too.

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  50. Sorry about your cheerios:(

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  51. Really nice Willow and effective!I got transported!:)

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  52. a wonderful ode to tartan. I couldnt watch Benjamin Button. Perhaps as I myself am so ungrounded now, I just didnt want to see it, too weird or something.

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  53. As the daughter of Irish Hoosiers, your poem really touched me. I believe that we are the product of all who came before us, and even though scant ancestral information was passed along in my family to future generations, I have a thirst for knowledge of our origins. I believe that by understanding where our ancestors came from, we understand ourselves.

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  54. Your thoughts on rhythm and
    tartan inspired me. Whilst out this afternoon I spied a red blackwatch scarf. Super long ... . lots of room for quite the repetitive march.
    It called my name and I could hear your whispering encouragement.

    Merci Madame!

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  55. Your thoughts on rhythm and
    tartan inspired me. Whilst out this afternoon I spied a red & black buffalo plaid scarf. Super long ... . lots of room for quite the repetitive march.
    It called my name and I could hear your whispering encouragement.

    Merci Madame!

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  56. Miss Willow -
    Your thoughts on rhythm and
    tartan inspired me. Whilst out this afternoon I spied a red & black buffalo plaid scarf. Super long ... . lots of room for quite the repetitive march.
    It called my name and I could hear your whispering encouragement.

    Merci Madame!

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  57. I also love the "wearing an atlas" line. It alone draws one in to the finish and there is a beautiful rhythm in your stanzas.

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  58. Thanks for all your kind comments, bloggy friends. It's always so much fun to post my poetry for you. ~x

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  59. Hi! Willow,
    Willow said,"I've been
    pondering the rhythm of tartans, tweeds and all things autumn and
    ancestral."


    What a very beautiful poem... entitled Tartan
    that you decided to share here with your readers.

    Thanks, for sharing!
    DeeDee :-D

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  60. w-I can hear the bagpipes and I am feeling the brisk breeze of fall coming. great take on a moment in time-c

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  61. Willow, the poem seems a personal gift from one tartan lover to another. I want a copy of the book of poetry that Country Girl suggests.... whenever it is available!

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)