Sunday, June 24, 2012

It's Easy to Believe


a very noir R.A.D. Stainforth ... he nearly sings at the end ...


God sits upstairs,

like over-sized Orson Welles
trying to sell wine
(but not before its time) –

ascot loose enough
to breathe judgment,
he makes convincing magazine cover,
with that curious 

“I'm preparing myself to forgive you”
look all over his face.

The process of purification is a best-seller;
steeplechases the unjust crowd.
Customers drink of the cup,
then chant on the bus:

“Swing low sweet chariot!”



tk/June 2012


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57 comments:

  1. Amazing, Tess... I love steeplechases.

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  2. Heard him loud and clear, Tess!

    Hank

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  3. I can feel a very Southern texture in this piece. Reminds me of the cafe's scenes in Flannery O'Connor's stories.

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    1. I love the conversational style Stainforth uses to read this one...as if you were sitting with him in a cafe...

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  4. 'The process of purification is a best seller' - oh yeah, baby!

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    1. i agree this is my favorite line too.

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  5. I love the tone of this brilliant

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  6. I really like the opening line ~

    An interesting prompt ~ It made me read and watched the black and white trailer for a bit ~

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  7. haha love the cynicism in this...the stanza from purification being a best seller on....tight...i like tess...

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  8. I am embarrased to say I've never hit the "play" arrow on your posts. Have you always quoted this Stainforth fellow? He is very noir and I am totally an airhead!!

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    1. Hitting the play arrow is always very worthwhile...I'm fortunate to have Stainforth present my poetry...he breathes life into my words...

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  9. My favorite part of this is the "Withnail & I" quote. Withnail forever!

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    1. I'm glad someone appreciated that bit...:^)

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    2. Tess, come by my blog - just posted a new Withnail-related bit. You might enjoy it. 8-)

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  10. perfect poem for this image!

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  11. Stainforth really does do justice to this marvellous piece of writing. (Keep the cigarette!)

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    1. Thanks Bee...yes the ciggy must stay...

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  12. thanks for sharing this Miss Tess!

    JJRod'z

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  13. Chanting on the bus made headlines in Toronto all this week, Tess. I love your poem, including the godliness of Orson Welles. Very vivid. Thank you for sharing this.

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  14. You are right ... I believed he might break into song. Loved the way the ash fell from his cig! Your poem was made for this reading .. great write!
    I would LOVE to see him on stage!!

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    1. Yes, I would, as well! He's very talented.

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  15. Yes, Stainforth does breathe life into your words. I read first, the listened and learned more from it. Loved the references to Ascot and the horse racing. Hope they all know the new rules now for the royal box...LOL I smiled at God handing out wine, but, not before its time.
    Nice read Tess. Made me smile.

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  16. I guess some people get a god complex when they want to feel powerful over others. sad but your story ture.

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  17. ...love the image of what a god might look like, if animate... pitifully pious...

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  18. The two of you make for exciting, vivid poetry.....and well...even more..it's like a living, breathing film!

    Bravi to both!

    ♥ Robin ♥

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  19. I really like God as Orson, or vice versa..one of them thought he was the other..glad you paired them!

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  20. I think he is actually holding his victims tie! Fun poem Tess,thanks-

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  21. The words are wonderful and the reading really is entertaining also!! Great one, Tess!!

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  22. These are great lines:

    “I'm preparing myself to forgive you”

    "The process of purification is a best-seller"

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  23. Ooh, great one, Tess. Rosemary Mint cited the same two lines I would have. R.A.D.'s reading is cutting and sublime at once.

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  24. Oooh, ouch! Poem writhes. Wonderful work!

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  25. Remarkable piece. I also agree that it felt very much like sharing a cup of coffee, as he reads...but I often feel that way!

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  26. Dear Tess: God that chariot is a rough ride. I imagine the fire from it's wooden wheels would scorch the earth to purify the hordes of masses rallying for forgiveness. Good thing God has a sense of humor.

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  27. A wonderful write! This pic reminded me of the old gangster and detective movies.

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  28. Loved it all from start to finish, but these word were my favorites:

    “I'm preparing myself to forgive you”
    look all over his face.

    The process of purification is a best-seller;

    Great read by RAD, too.

    =)

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  29. Excellent. Orson couldn't wait; he drank before its time...

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  30. A feast of references, as usual but of all the lines, the one that caught the pic for me was; “I'm preparing myself to forgive you”. But I smiled at the thought of God (or was it Orson) selling the wine, but not before its time. After all, if it was God, he has plenty of it... time, I mean, not forgiveness.

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  31. I'm a bit worried about this Orson Welles God! Ooooohhhh. Very interesting poem. k.

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  32. This has to be one of my favourite writes of yours Tess but I'm 100% sure it's my favourite RAD read of yours!

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  33. Give me some more God as the presidio steeplechaser !

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  34. My God. The new Bernie Taupin and Elton John. Those cigarette ashes should be collected and enshrined. That fucking guy blows me away. Of course he's got pure gold to work with. Whew. What a team...

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  35. Tess, this was a great photo, really inspiring. Love your words ... the ascot loose enough ... the steeplechase sort of sleaze cover-up. Great poem.

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  36. I just popped in after seeing your name on Berowne's post. Orson Welles is a big deal this week, which I love. His work was groundbreaking, and despite Berowne's correct assessment that much of Citizen Kane's excellence is due to Herman Mankewitz's script, I must say, the vision of Welles, the camera angles, the little touches, attention to detail, at such a young age, continue to impress.

    Your poem, with Big Daddy God loosening his ascot, is great. Allusion to the wine of communion (which is usually before its time, ha ha, cheap) was an especially good metaphor. Thanks for your great blog! Amy Barlow Liberatore, and here's one for you:
    http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/06/22/the-bible-in-33-words-exactly/

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    1. Thank you Sharp...nice to meet you...I'm off to visit your site...

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  37. Great take on an inspiring image.

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  38. Some fascinating comments ... if Tess (Bernie) writes the words, that makes me Elton John ... thanks to everyone ... "It's true, I crept the boards in my youth. It is the most shattering experience of a young man's life when one morning he awakes and quite reasonably says to himself 'I will never play the Dane.' When that moment comes, one's ambition ceases."

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    1. What happened to your cigar commercial?

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  39. Sue, about a dozen comments up, hit what I wanted to say. I've not been online much the last month. It is so good to now fill the well the rest of the way by reading the work of poets like you. This poem has something that made me want to sing it, actually...

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  40. Dear, Dear Readers, thank you so much for taking the time to read my words, and for your kind, and most generous comments. You inspire me to live, and write, another day. (My muse loves you, too.)

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)