Tuesday, April 24, 2012

You say lustreware...I say lusterware...


A glint of shiny copper caught my eye, among the jars and glassware on the housewares shelf at G-Dub (my local Goodwill store) last week. Magpies always go for the glitter. Sure enough, it was a little copper lusterware creamer; a total steal for $2.99.  (Sorry, I was hasty with the Goo Gone, and forgot to leave the wax pencil-marked price for all to enjoy.) Lusterware or lustreware, as our English friends like to spell it, is pottery or porcelain, with metallic oxides in the glaze, that give the effect of iridescence.

After a little research, I found this creamer was older than I suspected, dating from about 1810 to 1840, when most of the overall luster pieces were produced. The chip on the spout actually gives a clue to its origin, exposing the rough, red earthenware clay, used to make these pieces in England. The copper pieces are the most common, followed by silver, and then gold, the more rare and collectible. I now have one piece of each, in my  collection of three. The silver pieces were sometimes known as "poor man's silver", a shiny, inexpensive substitute for the real thing, back in the day.

Gibsons, Staffordshire, lusterware, silver
Wedgwood, Fallow Deer pattern, lusterware, gold

22 comments:

  1. I remember seeing pieces of lustreware in Grans china cabinet.

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  2. ooooo nice! I know what you mean...when I get my stash home..I rush to clean it..so as to make it sparkle in my hands and on my shelf...I would have tripped you over this one......good find gal

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  3. I have some pink lustreware...an old cup and saucer perhaps from 1850
    its very sweet

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  4. If anyone ever doubted that you were the coolest chick EVER, I just have one word for them now.

    BOO-YAHHHHHHH!

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  5. Interesting. I suspect I may have seen it in my grandmother's cabinets before they were thrown away or donated to charity or something like that. Yes, appearances and respectability counted for much in upwardly mobile lower middle class Britain in the nineteenth century.

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  6. Just a fabulous find. The three, I assume, will be displayed together?

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  7. Margaret, my shiny stuff is scattered...I have some vintage mercury glass too...I like to mix things up...

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  8. I love lustreware. I have several cream and sugar sets and a couple of old vases. Love it!! Thanks for visiting me Tess and becoming a follower. It means a lot to me. Laurel

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  9. You say lusterware; I say lust . . . er, where?

    "Is that what one should expect from a Bear?" you ask. Why, yes it is. Bearly

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  10. I used to have a few similar pieces myself; usually with some extra pattern. That's a goodie, and only 3 bucks? Lucky you!

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  11. What amazing goodies you found, and I especially like the poor man's silver (anything really) even more so than gold! Such an interesting collection!

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  12. We've got a couple of little jugs like this - in miniature - but nonetheless charming. Place it where the light can do its work.

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  13. These are absolutely lovely - what an exciting find.

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  14. What beautiful objects! Well done, you!

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  15. Very pretty - sounds like a good deal. K.

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  16. Oh I must be a magpie too as I do love that shiny lusterware!

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  17. OMG, what a find! I love things that have blemishes and in this case the chip should not affect its beauty. Your other pieces are lovely as well, but I think I prefer this one. Thanks for sharing.

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  18. That was a great find! You most certainly have a good eye...

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  19. Each piece is lovely. You have a great eye!

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  20. I am in love with lusterware. I have been lucky enough to find tea sets (incomplete, but delightful nonetheless) in periwinkle, pink, and light green.
    My lusterware cup runneth over. :)

    GREAT find on the beautiful creamer!

    ~ Diane

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)