Monday, December 5, 2011

Too Many Crumbs for a Broom





They linger,
still play in the keys,

stick to my fingers
with marmalade.

I sip coffee impulses,
snack between words

that spill to the desk,
litter the lunchroom

in crossword kisses.
I wear my best

alphabet outfit,
see London, see France,

munch and crunch
the sultry dance,

the sideways glance,
the clickety-clack.




tk/December 2011


Listen to R.A.D. Stainforth's sexy English accent:


Join Magpie Tales creative writing group here.
image: Lunch, George Tooker, 1964, Columbus Museum of Art

62 comments:

  1. Thank you, Tess and RAD, for giving us another great start to a delicious Sunday.

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  2. Thanks, G... always nice to see you at Willow Manor...lovely new profile pic!

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  3. Interesting that there is seemingly no interaction between the diners. Each is alone but perhaps they are having a "sideways glance" at their neighbor. Nice post.

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  4. Have always loved this painting and your words are perfect. The painting is so poignant to me...together, yet separate.
    Would like to see your alphabet dress : )

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  5. This poem brings life to the mundane...if only the diners could hear you think!

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  6. that spill to the desk,
    litter the lunchroom

    in crossword kisses.
    I wear my best


    love the lines, very dark yet wonderful imagery in your words.

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  7. a wonderful wistful whisper into my Sunday! nice.

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  8. was totally waiting for i see london i see france i see someones underpants...but kinda glad you did not follow that rhyme...smiles....interesting pic this week...have to think today...

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  9. Brian, glad you picked up on the reference to the kids' rhyme...

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  10. I notice how well the poem and your O. Henry quote fit together. Thanks for the picture, Tess, and your service making this whole thing possible. I am happy to be part of the growth of the site.

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  11. The interpretation of the quiet action in the painting has much more meaning now, with your words.

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  12. The diners look like something out of '1984' to me - can't imagine as less munchy bunch...♥

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  13. Very well done--I like the reference to that childhood "chant" that we used to say when we saw someone's underpants!

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  14. Deliciously thought provoking....:-)

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  15. There is an infinitely better outlook in your rhymes than in Tucker's "Lunch". I'd rather dance with you, even if only on the keyboard.

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  16. I liked pairing my jumpy piece with the somber Tooker...nice juxtaposition...

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  17. Lunch in the ordinary to casual viewer who can't read thoughts...love it!

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  18. R.A.D. ...as always, thank you for this lovely reading...

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  19. I enjoyed the poem but the sexy English accent (which I pounced on with joy) eluded me.

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  20. Rinkly, although R.A.D.'s accent
    is wonderfully British, it is mostly
    sexy in Ohio; elsewhere it is robust,
    audacious, husky with cigarette
    smoke, and always a joy to hear.
    Tess, your poem comes out of
    OH like a Sinclair Lewis nightmare,
    both a paean and a warning. I loved
    it; more so the fourth time I read it,
    looking for the threads of clarity.

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  21. What can I say, Tess? You're on fine form, as ever.

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  22. You really had me thinking here, I had to do a google search for 'I see London, I see France'.

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  23. For me, this surreal poem matches the picture. They both required a trawl through my subconscious but with enough lightness not to depress.

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  24. ... this is actually quite sexy, Tess.

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  25. Thanks, Helen, that was my intention...

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  26. Beautiful sounds in this. Lovely, tight writing.

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  27. Enjoyable read, Tess. As always, you have outdone yourself. BTW, LOVE your Facebook badge...

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  28. a fun poem, with a nice beat read so well by RAD

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  29. I love crossword kisses and the clickety-clack.

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  30. Such a great take. I love the clicketyclack and, of course, marmalade. K.

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  31. Dang computer. Can't hear the audio, but no matter, the piece is wonderful.

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  32. I like how you added dimension and sensuality to Lunch.

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  33. You've looked under the surface of these diners' blank exteriors to their hidden thoughts!

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  34. Found my way back! Great to be here! A stylishly Tooker painting. I like your poem, even though I'm not astute enough to understand each nuance...

    And...I joined in this time. (Thought I had commented earlier, but it's my crazy, and I have to live with it, or die without it.)

    Thanks for serving each Sunday, Tess.
    PEACE!

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  35. Nice to have you join Mag this week, Steve! Thanks, I enjoy doing it...it's my little way of contributing to the creative writing community...

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  36. Dear Tess,

    I have promised myself to enjoy poetry even if Ido not have the time to write at the moment.

    And what a find.

    The picture was too sombre for me. But your words - they give the diners an uplift.

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  37. This made me think of myself, endlessly playing words with friends like it was eating cake - the very best way to pass my time :)

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  38. I confess this one blew right past my comprehension ..but it did however, land right next to understanding
    nice little poem to go with the painting delightful
    and yes, I add my thanks for your
    offering up these thought provoking prompts week after week

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  39. Yum marmalade- crossword kisses are interesting- and I would have been cleaning up the crumbs! thanks.

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  40. Taken right back to jump rope rhymes before a delicious return to marmalade. Delightful read!

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  41. Your poem is a delightful puzzle for me...lovely sounds and contrast to Tooker's depressing painting. Many thanks for the prompts.

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  42. The "Clickity-Clack" you can almost feel it snapping away in this poem.

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  43. Dear Tess: Love this! We think alike; the sound of cutlery and fingers! Ah-ha! We must have eaten in this very same caf! A most excellent "snack between words" and "crossword kisses" so much fun and very imaginative!

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  44. this just made me think of all the crumbs probably stuck in my keyboard for all the snacking I do while writing :) Loved the "see London, see France" reference

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  45. Such a lonesome group of people- all together, but all so desperately alone. Very nice post, Tess!

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  46. They look so glum - definitely no marmalade on the menu...
    Cardboard sandwiches more like it.

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  47. Words and crumbs..can't have one without the other..love the abstract flow!

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  48. the title is delicious.... and the rest just sorta brings the broom out sweeping...

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  49. Marmalade might have produced some smiles amongst those diners ...
    lovely poem Tess

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  50. What's the comment's equivalent of a standing ovation? If I manage to think of one, I'll come back and give it. For now, bravo!

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  51. ... the sideways glance.

    So true - scared to venture outside their bubble.

    I went somber - I tired not too... ;)

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  52. I am late to arrive, as I have been away. The image seems a bit magical.

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  53. Great Write Tess. I like the flow & images. Some great lines too! "Crossword kisses"

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  54. I loved that "clickety clack" and can almost hear it throughout the poem. Beautifully done, disturbingly descriptive!

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  55. as usual....
    i am blown out of the water with you gift at writing.

    xx

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  56. i can just see these people lingering, not wanting to get back to work

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)