Monday, August 8, 2011

twilight


Summer Evening, Edward Hopper, 1947


Is it hares
or do rabbits dance
after the sun sets
in a peeved lilac bowl?

Is it written in some shepherd's almanac
or in the creases of a woodsman's hand?

Who holds the secret
that brings the bucolic vamp
infant and ancient

to swagger her spell
from the curve of her neck
hot, humming
like a boiling samovar?

Two long fingers twist high in a vee
strong with branches for many birds

she signals bats to circle
swifts to weave tribal high
in tribute above cattails
dame's rocket

before spitting out the bruised sky
chewed and swallowed



Tess Kincaid
August, 2011







Many thanks to the talented R.A.D. Stainforth for reading this piece.


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72 comments:

  1. I most especially love the last two lines. "The bruised day, chewed and swallowed."

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  2. before spitting out the bruised sky, chewed and swallowed...what a line...great pic for the mag this week too tess...

    see you tomorrow with mine...

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  3. "hot, humming like a boiling samovar"

    Beautiful writing.

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  4. Oh, my! No wonder there was a baby boom ;-)

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  5. Gotta hand it to you, Tess...you certainly know how to write.

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  6. to swagger her spell
    from the curve of her neck
    hot, humming
    like a boiling samovar?


    amazing lines, you sure know how to cast a spell with your words my friend...bravo :)

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  7. Love the lines:
    /swifts to weave tribal high/
    in tribute/--this piece pulsates
    with sexual energy and fecundity,
    makes the moss on the trees
    damp for sure, and it is so
    forest spiritual, wicked and
    Wick en, and when we try to
    envision this female powerful
    essence or entity, her beauty
    enraptures us, like the silkies
    before her. To know that there
    is a glen somewhere near the
    Manor where such goings on
    occur and you are allowed
    to be privy to on your twilight
    walks is very insightful and exciting
    and revealing.

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  8. Beautifully done, Tess.
    — K

    Kay, Alberta, Canada
    An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

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  9. Ah,,,,,,so beautiful and perfect!
    It suits *my world* to a *t*!

    You always inspire....

    Love,

    ♥ Robin ♥

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  10. Powerful evocation --love 'swagger her spell'!

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  11. I can feel the sultry summer in your poem. The heat seems to rise from your words. I, too, love the last 2 lines!

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  12. Tess -- Edward Hopper is fantastic. You have such a great eye for great art -- barbara

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  13. Your poem paints a sultry picture M'lady! Well done!

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  14. Sultry and samovar- Hmmmm that will get the brain working! thanks.

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  15. Who would have thought the vampire could create so much ire and havoc on an unsuspecting world. Beautiful poetry, Tess!

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  16. Bruised, chewed and swallowed...

    What a punch!

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  17. Kaykuala, I didn't write this with a vampire in mind, but it works on that level, too, doesn't it?

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  18. Oh wow! This is not what I expected when I first saw the photo! Lovely twist! :)

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  19. I like
    spitting out bruised chewed and swallowed sky

    wonder what's behind
    that spit
    that eye

    the rabbit hair
    and samovar

    eclectic wanderings
    across boundaries
    push identities
    to new shades

    contact lenses give way
    to glasses
    and roses
    give way to sky views

    perhaps where even bats
    get the boot

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  20. I love those sultry Hopper paintings.

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  21. Twilight does hold great sway over us; our hearts become restless for something to begin, our souls deep and wise enough to hold everything we've ever wanted. It's a sad place to be sure.

    You've written a wonderful poem, Tess, with imagery that lives and breathes, I know not through what magic.

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  22. I don't have much to say that's not already been said. The imagery and use of language is well done. The only shame is the title which has been monopolised by a certain series of books and films. This could stand a more interesting title than simply, 'Twilight'.

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  23. much to ponder here in the last two stanzas. you relay so well the sultry heat of summer. the passing of the day.

    I didnt think of vampire but i think there is a series of books about Twilight and vampires. oh my.

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  24. Jim and Suki, I am SO not a vampire fan, so believe it or not, I didn't know about the film and books...must come up with something else!

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  25. Anonymous...so lovely...thank you.

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  26. to swagger her spell - wonderfully delicious line :)
    Love the painting, skimpy little number for the 40's no?

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  27. Tess--love the abandon and wildness of this poem...

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  28. gorgeous and jam packed with inner tumult.

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  29. Okay...I changed the name to "Religious", to steer away from the vampire realm.

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  30. I noticed the title change. Well, I am also so not a vampire fan although once I read an Anne Rice just because everyone said her writing was so good. I dont know how I came upon Twilight in conjunction w/vampires, maybe browsing in bookstores.

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  31. Aaaargh! Tess! Don't go changin! In times of trouble..I like you jus the way you are!...Not your fault that there are confused assumers out there!..If you must change it at least keep the Twilight and put something in front of it!..Grey! Bruised! etc..Cheers!..

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  32. Gah! Okay...it's going back to Twilight. I like Twilight. You guys are making my Libra scales crazy.

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  33. It makes such a beautiful read! Love the choice of words...its soft and sensual and very, very poetic! :)

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  34. More than a read, it was an experience for the senses...and better each time I read it. Well done!

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  35. There is nothing better than a summer evening. So many intoxicating scents and senses. And always the anticipation of what the evening has to offer. You captured this feeling very succinctly.

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  36. wonderful use of language here. I love the Hopper, too. Always love his stark images.

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  37. Such dramatic imagery..it just touches so many emotions!

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  38. "to swagger her spell
    from the curve of her neck
    hot, humming
    like a boiling samovar?"
    Do you really think she is there?
    But... so many evocative images to test your readers as usual. You stretch me and I love it.

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  39. Each word in this delightful read holds a juicy image!

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  40. Loved this, Tess, it had a real 'Wuthering Heights' Emily Bronte darkness mixed with sensuality tone to it, fabulous last line.

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  41. Sultry and sensual! I can picture this!

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  42. all those lover reunited after the war- love the line "The bruised day, chewed and swallowed."
    Fabulous Tess.

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  43. Tess, yes it does, perfectly too! Less excitement is invoked in a simple one but not yours. An offering that could result in many interpretations is quality of a higher level. Keep at it!

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  44. beautiful...the feminine reigns here ...in the whole of your verse...sultry like the times...bkm

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  45. makes me think of Kali...what a force!

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  46. I have to get used to reding poetry again. Prose gives it all to you on a plate. I'm working with this one. Some images and lines there I need to chew and swallow.
    Great prompt.

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  47. Poetry is one of those things that is so easy to do - and so very difficult to do well. You, Tess, do it well.

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  48. "Is it written in some shepherd's almanac or in the creases of a woodsman's hand?"

    I love that line. And I love the idea that these two people are sitting on a southern porch, wondering about the mysteries of night.

    And just for the record, this was my favorite Magpie prompt of all time :)

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  49. Wonderful Tess, absolutely wonderful - you captured something quite magical.

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  50. a hot write for a hot summer.

    well done.
    :)

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  51. I liked the closing lines...
    Great Writing, Tess...
    who would have though about a n infant vampire from this pic!very imaginative...

    Thank you for the Prompt:)

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  52. before spitting out the bruised sky?
    Yuk!
    Raindrops would be a kinder option....

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  53. She is so sullen, isn't she? Boiling samovar I really enjoyed!

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  54. Deeper than it looks, this one.

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  55. Dear Tess: Definitely weaving magic word images here. I close my eyes as I hear your words on tape and I see the images clearly. Particularly infatuated with the tribal mother-earth goddess (Gaia) aspect of nature "rabbits dance" and then our man-made(er person-made) attempts to understand nature;

    "is it written in some shepherd's almanac or in the creases of a woodman's hand?"

    I have to think you are giving a nod of the hat to one of your many poets in residence mentors; Miss "vee"? Looking up samovar! Awesomely original and imaginative!

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  56. Thanks, everyone. You make it a real pleasure to share my stuff. You're the best. xx

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  57. You are such a great poet, Tess. I wonder about your process, how something this rich grows from you.
    "Two long fingers twist high in a vee strong with branches for many birds" is my favorite line.

    I never read others' Magpies before writing my own, so was intrigued that we both referred to bats and to spitting in ours this week...in much different ways, but still, it's interesting to me.

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  58. You are such an amazing Poem Writer..

    Love it!

    JJRod'z

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  59. Exotic and mysterious...
    "Who holds the secret that brings the bucolic vamp infant and ancient
    to swagger her spell from the curve of her neck"
    ...oh yes, who indeed!

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  60. Your poetry fills me up ... your voice intensifies the experience.

    ** My Aunt Helen wore an outfit just like Hopper's young woman when she was being courted by my Uncle Tom ... no wonder he was dumbstruck!

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  61. I am still wrestling with the notion of a "peeved lilac bowl".

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  62. Spitting out the bruised sky...Zowie! A sultry poem, ripe with images (I sweat just reading it; this is a compliment). But you don't need me to tell you that.
    Thank you.

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  63. I like the title and thankfully never gave vampires a thought!

    The 'bruised sky chewed up and swallowed.Perfect!

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  64. Intoxicating elements blended into one of those rare delicious flights from this suffocating earth.

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  65. I like your last two lines, too. :) gives the whole work a tie on the loose ends.

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)