Thursday, November 18, 2010

a good omen


Speaking of auspicious, here at the manor, it's considered a good omen to see a deer. This handsome young prince was meandering through the ginkgo leaves this week and I snapped a few shots through the wavy glass panes of the kitchen window. Yes, I know, they do like to nibble young trees and tender plants down to nubs, but I feel a thrill whenever I'm paid a visit; I draw a certain comfort from the otherwordly peace and dignity a buck exudes.

A few weeks ago, I was returning to my favorite corner spot in the leather sectional, which I fondly refer to as "my nest", in the sitting room off the kitchen, when a handsome older buck, king of the forest, a huge eight point rack, like antennae to higher powers, lifted his head from munching near the window, and met my gaze.

He looked at me, through the window, for what seemed to be minutes, with kind, intuitive eyes, and I felt as if we were old, dear friends. This moment of fresh, gentle love will stay tucked in a special cupboard of my mind's eye, a gift not to be forgotten.



I was talking to myself about you the other day, 
we were wondering what became of you. 

Friend Owl, Bambi, 1942


58 comments:

  1. Beautiful. We have an old owl that haunts our cedar tree at night. I get the same feeling when he's there (Winston, my dachshund, is not quite as keen on our vistor though).

    Great post. I felt as though I was seeing your friend through your eyes.

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  2. Rabbit, we also have an owl who hangs around in the tall cedar trees at night. His mellow call haunts, as well as comforts, me.

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  3. Beautiful animals. You are so lucky to live in such a lovely place.

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  4. Ah. I stumbled across a nubby-headed young man on a walk last fall & felt his nervousness as if it were my own. But he stayed...

    This guy, however, is magnificent! Powerful omen indeed. And I love the original version of Bambi. Lovely post, thank you.

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  5. We have an old pigeon which comes and sits in the garden sometimes : but no deers. You get the deers and we get the viaducts - it's the way of the world.

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  6. BEAUTIFUL - we have many deer crossing though our yard always- they have become quite friendly and trusting, knowing the laws here, I guess...no deer shooting in town. The dog just sees them as part of the yard- about as interesting as a rock.

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  7. ah, a lovely fellow indeed. I, too, feel blessed when the wild creatures let themselves be known to us.. It does my heart good, as well, to know of others not afraid to be still in order to greet them with a fond gaze.

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  8. All well and good my dear (deer) Willow, but the wretched beasts are slowly eating their way through my veg patch. I am not amused!

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  9. How beautiful, and I like the sense of otherworldly peace.

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  10. Yes, Cro, I can enjoy them since my vegetable garden bit the dust years ago. Actually, they would lean over the fence and eat the top 12 inches or so off my tomato plants.

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  11. I wouldn't care much about a garden if I could have such lovely creatures walking by. I only have peacocks and Ibis stroll by here.

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  12. I'm in the "they look good but don't want them nibbling my roses" brigade!

    Lovely photos

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  13. There are deer in the forests where we walk every day with our dogs. In the garden, just foxes and birds and amphibians.

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  14. Dear Willow, Deer are indeed such majestic beasts with, as you capture here, an other-worldliness about them which suggests that they know so much more than we mortals can ever know....

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  15. You have that hoosier luck
    with the animals too, it seems.
    Any of us that love pets, and
    take the time to catch the
    gaze of fellow creatures
    do get to wondering what they
    are thinking.

    This lovely moment you have
    shared with us was very
    tranquil and significant.
    I have a friend, a music composer,
    who lives up in the San Juan Islands,
    and there are a lot of deer that
    come through her yard, and munch
    the bird seed in her feeders.
    She snaps their pics, names them,
    greets them, and appreciates them.
    She gets a lot of visits from foxes
    too, that are protected from harm
    up on the islands.

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  16. How fortunate you are to have these magical creatures come to call....the deer, the owl....it's all a perfect addition to life at Willow Manor.

    Hugs,

    ♥ Robin ♥

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  17. Ah, this post made my day. How lucky that you and this magical deer were able to communicate.

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  18. Cro, how did I know you would take the non-romantic view on this issue?

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  19. Glenn, I have a little fox, who prances around the manor, like he owns the place.

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  20. what a blessing to have such friends come a visiting

    and that first photo is precious, what a handsome deer - i love the white ring around his mouth

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  21. Dear Lover of Deer ..
    We share the same love.

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  22. What a beautiful story, I loved it. :-)

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  23. these guys are most impressive. we have deer here but i have seen few this year and none with racks. such a lovely moment of communion between you two.

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  24. I wrote a poem about coming upon a deer in a park, it's on my blog entitled, "The Guests." Something about seeing the hoof and tail twitch of a wild animal...it is passion, it is vibrating, it is life.

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  25. Wow! He is SO beautiful and yes, the appearance of a stag is always a good portent.

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  26. Since you love them so much, may I ship the 16 that live in my back yard to you?

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  27. Aww very envious. The only deer here are in the National Park in Sutherland and of course were introduced species. All I get outside my window is wabbits, hundreds of wabbits.

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  28. Are you sure your eyes didn't meet those of Herne the Hunter?

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  29. We have no deer wandering around here in my big city, quail and rabbits is all I get to see - and the occasional hawk or coyote. There is something quite wonderful about sharing a stare with the majestic deer, I feel that way about horses as well. That's 2 good omens for you friend.

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  30. He's breathtaking.
    Lucky girl to have him around.

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  31. Beautiful! I love how you and the deer held each other's gaze...that feels like such a connection, especially with such a grand animal!

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  32. Upon reading your post, I got the Medicine Cards to see the meaning of deer. It says, deer teaches us to use the power of gentleness to touch the hearts and minds of wounded beings who are trying to keep us from Sacred Mountain. Like the dappling of Fawn's coat, both the light and the dark may be loved to create gentleness and safety for those who are seeking peace.

    That sounds like you to me.

    Deer...so gentle
    and loving you are.
    The flower of kindness,
    an embrace from afar.

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  33. What wonderful creatures they are. I was amazed at how many I saw strewn along the highways on my travels up north that had met unpleasant ends. It saddened me--we see them here at our place, where we are, too, and I always think they're very regal looking. I'm glad your buck had a calm, serene day.

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  34. R.J., 16?! Are you serious? Okay, send them on over.

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  35. Martin, hmm, maybe it was Herne. He was awfully handsome.

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  36. The power of gentleness. Annell, I love that.

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  37. Stunning. Puts the wren I'm very fond of into the shade!

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  38. I do so love it that you have tucked it away in your mind's cupboard.

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  39. I'll swap you one deer for the noisy, frisky, amorous boy koala who's roaming our garden at present Willow!
    Millie ^_^

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  40. They are such beautiful creatures. Their big brown eyes are so soulful.
    The time of your post today is very so very Willow...11:11.
    Even the l's in Willow look like an 11 : )

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  41. Never heard tht omen before, but , well if true we should be very blessed through the winter as deer come up to the bird feeders in the bck to graze and even to out front yard into the ravaged rose gardens; one year I was a bit too concerned that they would knock through the living room picture window while they were munching on the evergreens; now that would not be a good sign. :)

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  42. Those moments of communication with other species are so magical. And what a handsome fellow he is, to be sure!

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  43. An amorous koala? Millie, how adorable! ...I think.

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  44. LadyCat, you're so right. I never thought of "Willow" having an eleven in the middle. See, I told you they follow me!

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  45. What a perfect moment to cherich and remember!

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  46. Yes there is something noble about these large creatures...how can I begrudge a few shrubs and flowers?

    I like how he stayed and posed for you!

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  47. What a truly special moment you had with this beautiful creature. I just hope he never falls prey to some hunter's bullet. That would cause me so much grief.

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  48. What beautiful animals they are! I have a few deer that visit my property and prune the roses in spring and summer.

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  49. You see such wonderful things from your Manor windows, wavy or not. And to have such a magnificent buck gaze right into your eyes... heavenly.

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  50. I'm going to remember that phrase, "tucked in a special cupboard of my mind's eye." I have lots of memories tucked away in a cupboard just like that.

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  51. very cool. I really like deer and am thrilled to see one up close but I am equally glad I don't have them wandering in my yard eating all my flowers and plants.

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  52. I saw many deer today, and thought of you. Not only for the deer, but the thoughts from your recent post lingers in my mind. Your words followed me and waited quietly with me where ever I went. Funny how words can be like that. I suppose that is speaking to the soul.

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  53. Lovely! I feel such kinship, too, with deer. I love their mysterious ways!

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  54. Willow, I know exactly how you felt.

    Years ago in the Austrian alpsI went alone before light up to a new and steep brake to pick wild strawberries for breakfast. When I got there, a buck the size of an elephant was grazing in my strawberry patch. I knew it was his kingdom and I did not wish to disturb him. Our eyes met and I dropped my gaze, bent down and started pocking. He could have killed me with one hoof beat but graciously let me share his meadow and we co-existed harmoniously for at least half an hour or more. When I looked up, he had gone.

    It was one of those experiences that stays with one and one never forgets.

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  55. A buck the size of an elephant. That's just how this was, Arija. It's fun to know you had a similar experience, my friend!

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  56. Just beautiful. That accidental meeting with nature is one of the things I love most about being out in the country.

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)