Wednesday, June 10, 2009

overheard at the manor


WT: Hey, Honey, grab your camera! (Poking head in back door.)

Willow: Why?!

WT: There's an unusual snake out here!

Willow: Okay, just a sec.

Willow: Wait, wait! Let me get a close up!
((slight little SCREAM))

WT: Hurry! Did you get it?

Willow: Yeah, I got some good ones. Let's see if we can find it
online...

Someone out there...please...tell me I wasn't playing around with a
venomous Eastern Massasauga, one of Ohio's three deadly snakes.

95 comments:

  1. IDK about the kind of snake it is.. but EEEEEEEEEEEEEKKKKKKKKK

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  2. Geez, Willow, I looked at some pix of the Eastern Massauga online & I'm thinking you probably shouldn't play with this guy anymore. Yikes!

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  3. Ach! Could be. Hopefully it just writhered away into the bush...in another state!

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  4. I was afraid of all snakes until I met a friendly boa. She was as affectionate as a cat. I am still wary of unknown snakes and squeemish about walking barefoot in long grass.

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  5. HMMMMM - kinda' lookin' like it. This would have been such a sad end to one of my favorite blogs.
    No more photograghing snakes - I don't care how interesting they look. Swear?

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  6. Well, at least no one was hurt. The snake got away and you got a great photo. And it matches your banner. How cool is that?

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  7. yikes, Willow! Careful...but great pic~!

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  8. Beautiful snake -- did it have rattles?

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  9. What a great sight! Keep your distance, but seeing wildlife like that is such an honor.

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  10. Vicki, this one was small, obviously a baby and didn't have a row of rattles. But, from what I gather from online info, the babies don't have rattles.

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  11. Beautiful nature shots Willow. What a slinky, slithery beauty to come and visit. People mainly get into trouble with snakes because they themselves panic and do something to frighten the snake. If you respect each other's right of exixtence, they are a good vermin control. Wonderful captures.

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  12. I agree with Indiana Jones. I hate snakes. In Arizona we have Diamondback rattlesnakes hiding under bushes everywhere in the summer. I can't believe after living here for 38 years I haven't happened upon one. But if I do I don't think I'd be calm enough to take a picture!

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  13. COOL! But I would advise that the next time WT says, "Hey Honey, grab your camera" that you quickly don Hannah's bite-suit! :-o

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  14. That's nothing to clown around about!
    Catherine

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  15. Yikes, I know how you feel! Don't go leaving your door open! Must go and look that one up.

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  16. I hope you didn't pick it up!

    BTW, your Muirfield bad weather didn't show up this year, giving me a nice clear day to watch my man, Tiger Woods, win another tournament. Didn't see you, though.

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  17. Okay, I can't resist...

    WT called to Willow “Quick, Honey”
    She hoped from his tone it was funny.
    A camera she flashed
    At a rattler who passed
    Seeking warmth in a place much more sunny.

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  18. Could be. We have a big rat snake that lives under the country house. I found it in the garage one day.

    Here's a scary thought...down here they have rattlesnake round-ups and they kill all the snakes. Unfortunately they are inadvertently breeding silent rattlers because they only catch the ones with loud rattles. Lovely.

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  19. Catalyst, only the practice rounds had rain and then beautiful the rest of the week! Perfect tournament weather. No, I didn't go.

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  20. Oh I think it was a dangerous one, I showed my son and he said, forget the photo, shut the door and keep your shoes on.

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  21. Ellen, that's too scary about the silent rattlers! Yikes! We have big black snakes around here, huge ones, they always startle me, but they're not poisonous, so I'm not afraid of them. This little guy was a different story!

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  22. Suza, you're incredible!!! :D

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  23. We have the same 'moments' here on our property in South Australia Willow, but with King Browns. MOTH always invokes W.C. Fields at these moments 'Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite & furthermore always carry a small snake.'
    Millie ^_^

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  24. Millie, heh-heh! I think I'll adopt that W.C. Fields quote! :D

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  25. Bill, I think you're right! It's a deadly venomous Clownhead Snake! Yikes!!!

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  26. snakes, snakes every where...had a run in with one my self in my post yesterday. fun to watch but watch the bite! nice pics!

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  27. Hi Willow- found your blog thru julochka at MPC. Love it. Good luck with the snake. I didn't look it up, hopefully it's just a look-a-like. I love the ancestry stuff...where'd you learn all that?
    Can't wait to read more...

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  28. My goodness, some of us would have reached for a spade, a stick, a tool to protect ourselves.

    How did it fare with you two gawking?

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  29. Seeing it in the photograph is close enough for me!

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  30. This is a beautiful snake. I hope it goes away if it's dangerous. The manor doesn't need deadly snakes. If it's harmless I say keep him around. Neat pictures.

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  31. Scary looking creature, I hope you are safe and sound.

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  32. Yikes! Better not stick that one in your mailbox!

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  33. I hate, hate, HATE snakes. Ewwww

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  34. I couldn't have gotten anywhere near it! You're a braver woman than I am! Eeeewwww!!! ~Lori

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  35. It's rather beautiful isn't it? ....from a safe distance.

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  36. Beautiful shot and you know I love snakes!

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  37. Willow - you know the babies are MORE dangerous - right ?

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  38. Nonono!!
    Too spooky for me. I am afraid of snakes!!! Wear your wellies outside!

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  39. Mary! Ack!!! The babies are more dangerous? Are you SERIOUS?!

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  40. maybe it was an eastern foxsnake?

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  41. I hate snakes and feel a bit queezy now. Ellen's thought about the silent rattlers was really scary. I am not much of a hiker, so here in California I think I am safe from any snake camera opportunities!

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  42. Can we just go back to recipes, or lilacs, or movies now Willow? Somehow that seems friendlier than snakes….

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  43. Okay, I think I speak for everyone (pardon my impudence) but...if Gourmet has a snake recipe...ummmm...at least make it a fancy plate. I know, I've been watching too much stuff on the Western channel.

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  44. EEEEEEEEEEEEEKKKKKKKKK!!!!
    (I borrowed another commenter EeeK....)
    Hi! Willow, Please! be careful!...
    "Snakes"...a "rattler" to boot!

    DeeDee :-O

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  45. I had about the same thing happen...you can see at the post below. I twittered it and linked to flickr pictures and a biologist answered the question of what kind of snake it was. Luckily mine was a gopher/bull snake, a constrictor and harmless.

    http://waterrosez.blogspot.com/2009/04/front-yard-wildlifewhats-next.html

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  46. In the second photo, it appears to have the head shape of a pit viper.

    Was the tail blunt or did it taper to a fine point?

    I would say it was venomous because of it's head.

    We have several types of rattlesnakes, copperheads, water moccasins and of course the US's one and only the coral snake.

    The pattern and color can vary widely, you should trust more in the shape of the head and taper of the tail.

    Stay away from this fellow. This time of year they may be in pairs.

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  47. It's a beautiful creature, despite sounding scarily like a deadly one... Hope he/she has slithered far away and won't be back in a hurry!

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  48. Maybe we could get back to some more poetry Willow.....I feel shaky all over looking at this snake (even if he is the friendly variety)! ! ! xv

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  49. Little did I doubt
    that one day
    you'd find a snake
    looking sufficiently elegant
    to be photographed!

    But now, girl,
    run, run, run!!!!!!!!

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  50. At first I thought it looked like a Banana Phase King snake that my son once had...But then I noticed the triangular head...Whatever it is that one is poisonous dear!

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  51. Oh dear, this gave me the creeps. The smaller ones always do. Wish you luck and I hope it was not a venomous snake.

    Greetings from London.

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  52. You certainly know how to stir things up, Willow! I think I'd stand well clear of any snake, no matter what it might be!

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  53. At least you didn't try to pick it up from it's tail. My father-in-law the ever-mindful, once stopped on a road, got out of his car and moved a snake out of the road so it wouldn't get squished.



    He got bit. (Non-lethal but very stingy and throbbing poison)

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  54. Willow,
    Actually, I'm convinced that you encountered what is commonly known as the Eastern Milk snake. Probably not poisonous but who wants to find out. Most snakes are not aggressive toward humans unless cornered or surprised. You know, it's a survival thingy.
    go here: http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://magickcanoe.com/snakes/milk-snake-head-large.jpg&imgrefurl=http://magickcanoe.com/blog/2007/03/16/favourite-moments-7-eastern-milk-snake/&h=755&w=864&sz=199&tbnid=t6cNABn-sh8QRM:&tbnh=127&tbnw=145&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmilk%2Bsnake%2Bpictures&usg=__tKy6YqbEzmdLQ5wziF3S3QQ4ODM=&ei=KIIvSuy7BOXBtweVyfn-Cw&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=1&ct=image

    rel

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  55. I have never heard of a Clownhead snake but I have known a few clowns and the last one I ever wanted to know was in the Whine house.

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  56. i think the consensus here is to be respectful of snakes. i've seen massassauga rattlers several times in our part of the world - i walked right by one sunning on a rock outcrop without even knowing it was there. happily it didn't seem to care that i was there. like most snakes, they won't attack unless threatened. the problem usually is that a person accidentally steps on one or ignores the rattles that are asking you to push off somewhere else, at which time the little guy's defensive instincts kick in and he strikes out. he's probably looking for mice or frogs. thanks for the lovely pics!!! steven

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  57. Wow, I don't know if it's poisonous, but it sure is pretty :)

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  58. I would not have been a happy camper.......
    eeeeeeeeeeeeeek!

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  59. I just took the grandkids to the Columbus Zoo yesterday and we spent some time in the reptile house. The Eastern Massasauga on display was almost black. I wonder if there is more than one kind, or if by being in a controlled indoor environment makes the coloring different. Anyway, next time you see ANY snake with a broad, blunt head, run the other way, as that is a sign of it being venomous.

    Nice shots though!

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  60. thank goodness for the zoom lense. very pretty snake for sure. up here we dont have many venomous snakes but when i lived in Missouri folks told all kinds of scary tales.

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  61. No more going out in the yard for you.

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  62. and I moan about piddling little spiders!

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  63. Beautiful snake! In your photo, his head looks wide at the bottom which would indicate poisonous something or other. Have always respected snakes but I want to see them before they see me... just in case.

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  64. Eeeeekkkkk! Did he come from the mailbox?

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  65. I don't mind clowns so much, but snakes... eeeeekkkkkkkkkk! On a cheerier note: I'm going to make your raspberry cake today.

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  66. In the first picture, I clicked on it and enlarged to screen size (I have a big screen) and the pupil in the eye definitely looks round(which means non-venomous) to me and NOT elliptical (which means venomous...according to the site you linked to)...

    so I still say he was most likely non-venomous...I will stick with him being an Eastern Fox snake (also in the site you linked to)

    but, i hope that was a zoom lens and glad you stayed behind him.

    snakes are very fascinating creatures but you better respect them!

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  67. If he/she has no pointed head!
    He/she is DEAD ! QUICK!!

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  68. Just remember: pinch the neck just below the head with the thumb and forefinger. Don't try and pick it up by the tail...and you'll be okay!
    *kidding - absolutely kidding*

    I'd be upstairs in the bathroom with the door locked and a towel under the door just in case.

    Yeeeeikes, Willow! (Great photos though - you could always work for National Geographic.)

    Kat

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  69. You could change the name of your blog to Snake Manor, I suppose.

    Kat

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  70. Wow! The snake is absolutely gorgeous! I don't know what it is but I'm glad you could take these shots! :-)

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  71. Victoria from KCWed Jun 10, 11:58:00 AM

    Heavens to Murgatroyd, Willow!!!

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  72. Great shots .. you are always putting yourself out there for us .. this time tho you coulda used a longer lens

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  73. I was at a coffeehouse recently and a little garden snake was passing through...OMG what reactions...big robust people dashing home...snakes make people so nervous! Yours is downright scary.

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  74. Makes our UK adder look pretty feeble. I expect it is far away by now so not to worry!

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  75. Wikied it and yes...I'm almost sure it was willow.

    Also from Wikipedia:

    The venom of the Eastern Massasauga contains specialized digestive enzymes that disrupt blood flow and prevent blood clotting. Severe internal bleeding causes the death of the small animals that this snake eats.

    There are only two recorded incidents of people dying from massasauga rattlesnake bites.

    I hope WT either killed it or carefully took it far away!

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  76. I LOVE snakes. they are generally pretty shy and just want to get out of the way- I love the shots of this beauty.I only know about rattle snakes having grown up around them- predictable except when molting, then they can't see and will strike. Snakes are awesome. Glad this one got it's photograph taken instead of it's life.

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  77. Being in California I don't know your snakes but it with that head shape it looks like a viper to me. Egads woman!

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  78. Never never never ever play with snakes. Even the nice ones.

    Y I K E S !!!

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  79. Willow
    Consider it an honor that a rare species graced you with its presents, and you did not panic and kill the poor creature...
    the Native America's viewed such events as messengers, Snake – Snake is a powerful guide for healers. It carries the ability to transform, like a snake shedding its skin to reveal a renewed body and self. Snake enables shamans to transmute poisons of the body and mind.
    some more snake information
    Native Americans often saw in snake the idea of death/rebirth because it sheds its skin and seems about to die when it does so. Creativity, transformation, and moving forward without looking back are all connected to this view of snake. "Creativity" is also an attribute of kundalini or serpent energy; in this Eastern idea, serpent fire is coiled at the base of the spine, and as its energy is released up the spine, it activates all the chakras (energy centers in the body) and helps develop the body, mind, and spirit. These ideas have also been adopted by many modern students of the metaphysical; snake energy in all these traditions is usually accessed through some form of meditation. Greeks associated the snake with healing and alchemy: the staff of Aesculapius, a rough stick with a snake twined about it, is used as a symbol by doctors trained in Western-style medicine. (A similar symbol with two intertwined snakes, the caduceus, symbolized peace, commerce, and trade; it has often been confused with the staff of Aesculapius.) And the Egyptians depicted a rearing cobra in the uraeus, a headband/crown that symbolized both sovereignty over lower Egypt (and, some believe, over the universe) and divine protection of the royal who wore it.

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  80. I think it is a northern copperhead and you should be very careful. Also be alert as there may be a nest of baby copperheads somewhere close by.

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  81. Without seeing the end of the tail, I think that was just a corn snake, I have seen plenty of those around here, they're harmless...except to furry snack packs like mice n' rats...no rattle, no worries...'tis just a pretty snake.

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  82. Intriguing stuff, Joanny, thank you!

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  83. Thanks, anon, our awareness of dangerous snakes has certainly been heightened this week!

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  84. I wonder if there is a place where you could send the picture to find out exactly what kind of snake it is.

    While reading all the comments it seems that a professional opinion should help solve the question. But mostly the comment about the fact there could be a whole nest of babies around was what scared me the most.

    Snakes are fine as long as they are not near me. Now I am worried about your safety. Stay safe please.

    God bless.

    PS...my youngest grandson's father has a lot of snakes and grandson plays with them all the time. Gives me chills.

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  85. Where my snake phobia came from I don't know...but I can't even look at a picture of one without squirming nevermind take a picture of one...I think what I don't like about snakes is that they sneak up on you...you can almost be stepping on one before you see it...wonder what your snake really is?

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  86. If it is a baby, where's mom and the siblings? Maybe this one slithered away from home.

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  87. Laura is correct.. that is a corn snake. They come in different colors so be aware of that if you look up pictures. Generally speaking, in North America all of the posionous snakes have short fat bodies, the exception being the coral snake.

    Like someone else already said, thank you for not killing it.

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)