Monday, December 1, 2008

December

Winter, Andrew Wyeth, 1946

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.
.
My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.
.
He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.
.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.
.
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Robert Frost
.
I woke up to huge blowing snowflakes this first morning of
December! I adore this poem by Robert Frost. There are a lot
of interpretations as to the meaning behind it, but I just love its
basic simplicity. The last two lines are what really put the spin
on it, though.

37 comments:

  1. Wyeth and Frost together in the same post. Beautiful. Thank you, Willow.

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  2. ever so perfect!!! And missed you

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  3. Frost is one of my favourite poets and I've just had one o fthose strange and eerie moments where two images that are apparently disassociated, unite in a single embrace to form a unique vision. I visited another Cuban blogger just a while ago and he had uploaded the Billy Joel's video of the song 'Downeaster Alexa'. I love the song but had never seen the video. And now that I've come to your blog, willow, and see that beautiful image decorating your lovely post I can't get the Frost poem out of my head but with a thumping drum in the background and a fiddle soloing in the middle. Strange, I know, but true.

    Thanks for a lovely poem, image and post. And, also, I am jealous, there's no snow in London any longer. I would like a little of white fluff, can you send some my way :-)?

    Greetings from London.

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  4. This poem is beautiful and profound but also painting, I did not know Andrew Wyeth, thank you.
    Like a Cuban in London I'm also jealous, no snow in Poitiers now.

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  5. Robert Frost is probably my favorite American poet! And I love "Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening"!

    No snow here, yet!

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  6. lovely picture, beautiful poem, strange sounding cereal mixture :)

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  7. Cuban, MTA and Lynette--

    Well, I would have sent some your way, only it has stopped snowing now and it didn't stick! :(

    French Fancy-- I can't eat straight Fiber One. Healthy as it is, it's like eating little twigs. So, I mix it with Cheerios and love it!

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  8. I love Andrew Wyeth. Willow are you familiar with Alex Colville a bit of a Canadian Wyeth in both his technique and subject matter. Also Christopher Pratt as well as his wife Mary Pratt.

    Horse and Train is a favourite Colville painting.

    www.artgalleryofhamilton.com/aa_collect_can.php

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  9. Willow - I agree with you - I also love the basic simplicity - you paired it so well with the Weyth image - Snow? - oh, I'm glad it is you and not I, and I'm happy you enjoy it so!

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  10. Snow for you to welcome December! Lucky girl! Edward and I wish you a most happy day! And Edward suggests taking a long walk in the snow, but reminds you to have someone wipe off your feet really well when you get home.

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  11. Susan--Thank you so much for this introduction. "Horse and Train" is wonderful! I just read that it was inspired by Roy Campbell's poem.

    "Against a regiment I oppose a brain
    And a dark horse against an armored train."

    Now, I'm off to browse more! :)

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  12. What a treat to happen upon your blog. I love it here! I stepped through from Suki's splendid site and discovered one of my very favorite poems. How grand! I shall stay and have a look around if you don't mind . . . and I've clearly marked the trail to return again and again. : )

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  13. The perfect pair! My favorite poem and a wonderful picture.

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  14. Love this poem! I have a vintage brooch I wear in the winter that always reminds me of this Frost poem. :)

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  15. I like the poem with that painting... perfect choice.

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  16. ... "and miles to go before I sleep", one of my favorite poem lines, thank you! :-)

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  17. My favorite poet and one of my favorite painters.

    Thanks for sharing,

    Troy and Martha

    PS: yes...thistle

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  18. Ahhh, one of my favorites. It was quite cozy to read it just now while sipping hot chocolate, although there are no snowflakes in my neck of the woods.

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  19. My second favorite poem.. first? Sailing to Byzantium

    :-Daryl

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  20. First learned the poem as a ten year old in England with no interpretation at all.
    I thought the speaker was just hanging out in the woods.
    Then taught it often.
    A sort of Rorsach test.
    Cheery people said the speaker was Santa with gifts.
    Gloomy ones said an incipient suicide.
    And so it goes.
    Gosh! Snow already?!

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  21. Oh I am just so envious of your snow, I adore snow and we don't get enough here. Love the new piccie of the Manor in winter.

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  22. Always loved this poem, and it's great paired with the Wyeth art.

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  23. Nice poem, Willow. This is my first winter here in US and I just love it. :)

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  24. Willow, you've set the mood for the whole month with this poem and painting! Stay comfy!

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  25. Promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep. Was it ever thus? It was nice to be reminded of this gem, and paired so well with Wyeth's picture. Thank you!

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  26. I love that one too, especially the last verse.

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  27. BTW .. that hill in the painting reminds me eerily of Christina's World ...

    :-Daryl

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  28. This poem is one of my favourites. It's a shame that poetry submissions for publication are restricted to 'prose poetry' only. I have preferred the lines that rhyme to the ones that don't.

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  29. Daryl, I know! It does! I wonder if it is the same hill. Now I am going to have to go find out...

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  30. My absolute favorite poem in the world! I had my three children memorize it when very young. Whenever I read it again, like here on your blog, the words disappear and I am transported. Living in West Michigan and covered with snow for at least five months of the year, we have many snowy woods around...the perfect place for a walk in solitude to ponder the beauty and profundity of wordsmiths like Frost. Thanks so much for the gift of nostalgia!

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  32. I love, love love this poem!! One of my absolute favorites.

    :)

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  33. I have Frost's poem on my blog (Promises to Keep) also. Very powerful words, aren't they? Since becoming disabled, they keep me from crawling inward, and keep my striving to do more than I think I can. Your site is beautiful and I am so glad I found it. Nancy

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  34. Dear Willow,

    that poem haunts readers. anyone who has read this poem with poetry in their hearts is haunted by the last 2 lines ........but i have promises to keep
    and miles to go before i sleep.. and miles to go before i sleep..
    i also like some lines from birches and robert frost is on top of my list of literary greats
    Ofelia

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  35. Robert Frost is one of my favorite poets also, I use 'milestogo' as my ID in many rooms on the web. It has special significance to me, I went thru and triumphed over stage 3 breast cancer almost 7 years ago at the age of 36. I felt that all the surgeries, the year of chemo and the weeks of rads left me feeling that I had '...miles to go before I sleep...' and by sleep, I was meaning rest and relief, I had a couple people misunderstand and thought I was referring to my death....lol. anyway, I love your blog and would love to follow you, your "about me" section describes what I love perfectly. have a wonderful Christmas :)

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  36. My wife thought the man stopping in the woods might be Santa.

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)