Monday, July 14, 2008

Willow's Potato Salad


It must be my Scots-Irish DNA speaking, but I love potatoes; any
kind, prepared any way. This summer, I concocted this version of
potato salad. Everybody here at the Manor is absolutely nutty about
it. Hope you and yours enjoy it as much as we do!

Willow's Potato Salad

12 large sized red potatoes
1 1/2 cup mayo
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
1/4 cup dried or fresh snipped chives
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/4 tsp onion powder (not onion salt), optional

Simmer the whole potatoes, skins on, in large stock
pot until very tender. Cool completely. Mix ingredients
and add to sliced, cooled potatoes. Serve immediately
at room temperature.

24 comments:

  1. First chocolate cake, now potato salad! What are you trying to do to me! It looks delicious, simply delicious!

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  2. I love potato salad that has been refrigerated...nothing better. I like it with red potatoes too...makes for a great and interesting color.

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  3. Looks so dee-lish!...especially in your Texasware bowl! :) Me too on loving potatoes!

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  4. mmmm, I love potato salad. My sister makes the best I've ever tasted. Even though we use the same ingredients hers always tastes better than mine.

    I'll have to give your recipe a go. Looks yummy.

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  5. I know, I know....I'm torturing all of you this week with food pictures!!!

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  6. My mom's potato salad was a staple of our family's summer diet. She made some a couple weekends ago, and shared some with me. (After all these years, she never has quite gotten the hang of cooking just for one.)

    I'll have to pass along this recipe, 'cause it sure looks good!

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  7. Oh, Yum!!! This looks great...I'm with you about potatoes...Honestly, I can't really think of any way that I don't like them cooked.... Sounds and looks like another great Willow concoction to try! Thanks for sharing this ...:-)

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  8. Willow...lots of Irish in my family as well...my family loves potato salad....recipe handed down from my grandmother. Yours looks and sounds delicious :)

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  9. I’m one of four children and there were times when money was tight but we never went hungry. Ate an awful lot of potatoes but never went hungry. My parents occasionally went without lunch but we didn’t know about it at the time. I didn’t really have a healthy relationship with food until I was 18 though. I found eating tedious and was incredibly fussy (my poor mother) but surprisingly, the food in university halls changed that. I think it was the vegetables, but also the fact that I’d gone from a situation where I could control what I was eating (“Don’t like it”) to one where I either ate what I was given or went hungry (and had gone beyond the point of childish stubbornness where I would go without food quite happily).

    I do get extremely irrational and almost violent when I get properly hungry though. Shaking hands. People who know me generally ask, if they’re phoning around meal times, “Have you eaten yet?” before beginning a conversation; if I haven’t, they phone back later. So perhaps it’s more to do with my general metabolic reaction to hunger and my fear of crowds.

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  10. it sounds just yummy, willow! i am a big fan of potato salad served at room temperature. thanks for sharing!

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  11. R.A.D., one of my sons was a very picky eater growing up. And he still is, to a certain extent, but it did help for him to go off to college and sometimes have to eat what he didn't want to.

    I'll make sure you've eaten before I venture over to your blog.

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  12. Oooh--that sounds good--smoked paprika, eh? I'll have to give it a try: maybe it's my Scots-Irish background, but I've never met a potato I didn't like! Thanks for the recipe!! I love potato salad.

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  13. A Brush, your onion post made me so hungry for them, that I made a big pan of the most delicious carmelized Vidalia onions last night. mmmmmmm.

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  14. Not just the potato salad, but the bowl intrigues me as well. I collect retro-stoneware (English only please!)and that bowl looks like something I would definitely pick up and take home.
    My own Irish heritage prevails upon me to eat the humble spud at every opportunity - this salad will be made very soon in this house!

    Kat

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  15. Kat, this is one of my collection of Texasware bowls. I like to use them for mixing because they are so light weight. I also have a weakness for vintage stoneware bowls, not necessarily English, but just if I like the color and shape.

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  16. Potatos were the waiters, potatos were the waiters.

    I remember those lines from a poem about a fairy band I think. Do you remember what it was? Love potato salad of all varieties. I'll be anxious to try this one. Pappy

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  17. Oh Willow! That looks so yummy! I am so going to try it!!!!!! I think I have the same DNA as yours!

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  18. Pappy, yes! By Vachel Lindsay! So charming...I love this little piece:

    The noble Irish lady
    Who makes potatoes dance,
    The witty Irish lady,
    The saucy Irish lady,
    The laughing Irish lady
    Who makes potatoes prance.

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  19. Luckily I have already eaten lunch or I would now be hungry ... your recipe is similar to mine ... but I use Idaho taters w/o skins ...

    :-Daryl

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  20. Your potato salad looks simply scrumptious...and I'm right with you on an absolute LOVE of potatoes! Any way, and every way - yum!

    I think it's interesting the Irish got the reputation for loving potatoes, but they never saw a potato until the discovery of the New World, because potatoes are indigenous to the Americas!

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  21. Very tempting. I love potato salad.

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  22. My mouth is watering again! Definitely going to try the mustard in my next potato salad.

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  23. Well I'm betting it's another Willow wonder. It's printed out... :)

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Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of existence.
― O. Henry (and me)